Linetec and Valspar provides consistent, durable finish for Aspen Art Museum

AAM_Roof_Eleven_Skalko-web-400pxAt nearly 8,000 feet above sea level, Aspen, Colorado, is known for its mountain ski slopes that rise seemingly from the heart of the town’s central business district. Echoing these snowy and forested surroundings, design architect and 2014 Pritzker Prize for Architecture winner, Shigeru Ban and his New York practice, Shigeru Ban Architects + Dean Maltz Architect (SBA) designed the new $45 million Aspen Art Museum (AAM), which was completed along with Colorado-based executive architects Cottle Carr Yaw Architects (CCY). Featuring an iconic, composite geometric screen that drapes the museum’s bright glass and white metal exterior on two sides, the new AAM facility was completed in August 2014. The new museum houses 17,500 square feet of exhibition space in all, with over 12,500 square feet of dedicated interior gallery space—more than tripling the former museum facility’s exhibition capabilities.

AAM_GrandStairThree_Skalko_2014-webLinetec finished the aluminum-framed curtainwall, windows, sliding door and skylight systems in its Pure White color. Using Valspar’s Fluropon®, Linetec matched and blended the 70 percent polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) coating in-house to provide a consistent appearance across multiple products and manufacturers. The large openings’ direct light is shaded on two sides of the building by the Prodema screen, which is a synthesis of paper and resin veneered with wood. Natural light is maximized from all elevations to illuminate the museum’s grand staircase, corridor, main street entry and four of six gallery spaces.

“The museum’s lattice screen, bright white finishes and vast amounts of glass create a beautifully intricate play of light and shadow throughout the building. It’s a truly beautiful structure and a very environmentally sound project as well,” describes Linetec’s senior marketing specialist, Tammy Schroeder, LEED Green Associates.

To enter the 33,000-square-foot museum, located a block and a half from the main ski gondola, visitors may take an external staircase or, upon entry through the main E. Hyman Avenue street-level entry, a glass “moving room” elevator cab to the rooftop sculpture garden and café space on the third level for panoramic views of the Rocky Mountains. From there, they can then descend to the galleries, exiting again at street level. Architect Shigeru Ban says this progression mimics the act of skiing: “You rise up, you get the views, then you descend.”

AAM_GalleryWindow_Skalko_2014-webSBA was very specific about their design vision and its color selections, according to Rob Seils, Linetec sales manager. He says, “They wanted the finish to be uniform and consistent from one building material to the next. Coating materials, manufacturing processes and equipment, as well as color measuring standards can vary significantly amongst coating applicators. The best way to control color consistency is to use one coating manufacturer and applicator whenever possible. Our color-matching experts scanned color samples, analyzed them with our exclusive color management software, and created the recipe of tints and bases to precisely match the color sample.”

Customer samples and color match requests are typically processed and completed in 24 hours for most in-house blendable colors. For SBA and the Aspen Art Museum, these quick-turn timelines were maintained, as was open communication and consultation with Valspar. “Our lab associates can match anything, from a piece of metal to a section of masonry, to a swatch of fabric,” Seils notes.

“The process to successfully match a color involves chemistry and the appropriate lighting,” elaborates Valspar’s technical manager for extrusion coatings, Mike Churchill. “When we receive a color to match, we analyze its pigment composition — which defines its chemistry. Utilizing only one light source, a given color could be matched with multiple pigment combinations. However, if you change the light source, each of the matches will look visually different from one another and some differences can be quite dramatic. For exterior coatings, the final review of the matched panels should be done at midday outdoors and not in an office setting with fluorescent lights. If you review the panel under fluorescent lights, it may not appear to be as close a match as desired.

AAM_GalleryRoofDeck_Skalko_2014-web2To meet the architects’ visual and performance requirements, Linetec and Valspar recommended a three-coat Fluropon finish – primer, top coat (color coat) and clear coat. “Typically, with lighter colors clear coats are not used. The resins in the clear coat have a yellowish tint. When applied at the lower dry film thickness typical of a normal clear coat spray application, this will result in the finish having a slightly orange peeled and blotchy appearance,” cautions Churchill. “For this application, we were fortunate that the color choice was a yellowish shade of an off-white color. This enabled a thicker film clear coat to be applied. The thicker films level out better for a more even look and provide added protection against UV at the higher Aspen elevation.”

AAM_ExtCorner1_Skalko-webThe museum’s elevation and the prevailing local climate were key concerns. “UV radiation is one of the biggest culprits for degrading paint’s performance, causing loss of gloss, chalking and color fade. For every 1000 meters above sea level, UV radiation levels increase approximately 12 percent,” says Churchill. “Valspar’s Fluropon coatings are among the most weather-resistant of all finishes, meeting the most demanding exterior architectural specification, AAMA 2605-13.”

AAMA’s rigorous testing performance standards include more than 2,000 hours of prohesion (cyclic corrosion) exposures; 4,000 hours of humidity resistance; and a variety of physical property and chemical resistance testing. AAMA standards also require the coating to maintain specified standards of film integrity, color retention, chalk resistance and gloss retention for a period of 10 years. Valspar’s Fluropon coatings have demonstrated their performance for nearly 50 years in real-world applications. They also successfully have met the Equatorial Mount with Mirrors for Acceleration with Water (EMMAQUA®) testing, Q-TRAC sunlight concentrator testing and Florida outdoor exposure testing.

Further managing UV and solar heat gain, the Museum’s 12,000 square foot, custom-built EFCO curtainwall system features Wausau Window and Wall Systems’ operable windows and triple insulated glass units (IGUs) from Viracon. “Our 2250i-XLT series window, open for 2-inch overall glass and glazing by Harmon, met the tough thermal requirements of the project,” says Jay Albee, Wausau’s product and pricing specialist.

Glazing contractor Harmon, Inc. installed the curtainwall system and was also responsibleAAM_ChildrenStairTwo_Skalko_2014-web for the museum’s structural glass floor skylights and SAFTIFIRST fire-rated exterior and interior curtainwall. “The project is like no other; the enclosure systems we installed are technically custom and specific to the design intent. Harmon’s ‘innovative solutions,’ with the assistance of LTS Drafting and Engineering, Stutzki Engineering, Quast Consulting and Testing and Architectural Aluminum Fabrication, Inc. offered the project a means to meet SBA’s design criteria in terms of aesthetics and performance,” says Harmon’s senior project manager, Jason Nimmo.

“The installation of these custom systems was quite challenging,” Nimmo acknowledges. “At the same time, the finished product is something we will always take pride in. The customization of the EFCO 5500X curtainwall system started with Linetec’s fine finishing skills and ended with custom through-mullion sex-bolt connections via 3/8-inch aluminum knife plates. These knife plates connected the curtainwall system to the inboard structure and the outboard steel grid system that supports the woven panel screen wall. This particular detail is pronounced at the grand stair, as the curtainwall connection brackets span more than 8-feet overhead — perpendicular to the stairs — before tying into an embed at the post-tension concrete floors.”

AAM_Roof_TwoDay_Skalko-webNimmo adds, “Although, the exterior views of the enclosure systems are masked by the custom, woven panel screen wall system, the views from the interior are definitely appealing. The AAM building is truly an architectural icon.”

Helping make this destination accessible for all, the glass elevator provides functionality, transparency and complements the grand stair. “The application itself presented several hurdles for SAFTIFIRST; being a two-hour, exterior, elevator enclosure. Our engineering and project management worked closely with Harmon, SBA and CCY to ensure a seamless integration of our system into the overall design,” states Timothy Nass, vice president of national sales for SAFTIFIRST.

Nass continues, “The aesthetic challenges required coordination with other manufacturers and Linetec’s ability to provide us with a custom, painted finish solidified our goal of blending in with the adjacent, non-rated systems. While code compliance is always priority number one, controlling the elements, ensuring thermal integrity and meeting the unique requirements of an elevator shaft were also top priorities.”

Taking the glass elevator to the rooftop sculpture garden, visitors enjoy a different perspective as they look through the large skylights into the gallery space below. Harmon installed the Panda sliding doors and skylights from Super Sky Products Enterprises, LLC. These skylights include a 36-foot-6-inch-square, triangular single pitch unit with a diagonal framing pattern, and an L-shaped single pitch unit stretching 5-feet-wide by 44-feet-long on each leg. Viracon supplied the low-iron, fritted glass for both units. Meeting maximum height elevations established by the design team, the skylights have very shallow slopes (1.14 and 3.0 degrees).

“To promote optimum water shedding, Super Sky’s Total Flush Glazing system was usedAAM_EntryLobby_Skalko_2014-web to eliminate the use of standard pressure plates, which would have restricted water flow off the glass surface,” explains Super Sky’s project manager, Todd Wilde. “Both units were supported by a very unique and finely crafted exposed wood timber truss system. Close coordination with the roof truss geometry was essential to ensure that support post base plates lined up with the roof truss top chord intersections, as well as having the framing members align with truss top chord members.”

Strategic placement of the skylights helps minimize the use of electricity, combined with photovoltaic panels. With their stringent lighting and climate-control needs, museums tend to consume large amounts of energy. However, the Aspen Art Museum utilizes what the architectural team refers to as a “thermos” design, in which the most energy-demanding spaces are placed at the center of the building, surrounded with circulation space. This double-layered building envelope maintains proper humidity levels in the galleries without expending unnecessary energy and costs to adjust those levels elsewhere. The exterior curtainwall, window and entrance systems’ Pure White color finish also reflects the solar radiation, which further contributes to the museum’s overall energy savings.

AAM_Roof_One_Skalko-webOther energy-efficient aspects include recycling of “waste heat” and a chilled water-cooling system. By redirecting excess heat to the noncritical building perimeter and outside the snowmelt areas, the galleries are protected from overheating in a well insulated, sealed building envelope. Chilled water provides cooling systems to the galleries year-round, in lieu of natural ventilation, which would compromise indoor air-quality standards in critical areas.

With respect to the contributions and collaboration of the project’s team members, SAFTIFIRST’s Nass summarizes, “Everyone associated with the project proved that they were tops in their respective fields. It is truly an honor to be associated with a building such as this.”

**

Aspen Art Museum; 637 East Hyman Avenue, Aspen, Colorado 81611; https://www.aspenartmuseum.org
• Owner’s representative and project manager: O’Connor Consulting, LLC; Basalt, Colorado; http://www.oconnorconsult.com
• Architect: Shigeru Ban Architects + Dean Maltz Architect; Tokyo, Japan; http://www.shigerubanarchitects.com; New York office, http://www.dma-ny.com/site_sba/?page_id=309
• Executive architect: Cottle Carr Yaw Architects, Ltd.; Basalt, Colorado; http://www.ccyarchitects.com
• General contractor: Turner Construction Company; Denver office; http://www.turnerconstruction.com
• Construction manager – local contractor: Summit Construction Company; Basalt, Colorado; http://cosummitconstruction.com
• Glazing contractor and curtainwall fabricator: Harmon, Inc.; Denver office; http://www.harmoninc.com
• Exterior curtainwall – drafting and engineering: LTS Drafting and Engineering; Englewood, Colorado; http://www.ltsdrafting.com
• Exterior curtainwall – engineering consulting: Stutzki Engineering, Inc.; Milwaukee; http://stutzkiengineering.com
• Exterior curtainwall – testing: Quast Consulting and Testing, Inc.; Mosinee, Wisconsin; http://www.qcandt.com/
• Exterior curtainwall – fabrication: Architectural Aluminum Fabrication, Inc.; Aurora, Colorado
• Exterior curtainwall, window and skylight system – glass fabricator: Viracon, Inc.; Owatonna, Minnesota; http://www.viracon.com
• Exterior curtainwall system – manufacturer: EFCO; Monett, Missouri; http://www.efcocorp.com
• Interior curtainwall – manufacturer: SAFTIFIRST; Brisbane, California; http://www.safti.com
• Sliding doors – manufacturer: Panda Windows & Doors; North Las Vegas, Nevada; http://www.panda-windows.com
• Window system – manufacturer: Wausau Window and Wall Systems; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.wausauwindow.com
• Skylight system – manufacturer: Super Sky Products Enterprises, LLC; Mequon, Wisconsin; http://www.supersky.com
• Curtainwall, window, sliding door and skylight systems – finisher: Linetec; Wausau, Wisconsin; http://www.linetec.com
• Curtainwall, window, sliding door and skylight systems – finish: Valspar 70% PVDF Fluropon®; The Valspar Corporation; Minneapolis; http://www.valsparcoilextrusion.com

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Specify Aluminum Stretch Forming with Confidence

Banner-Curved-blue

Stretch forming is a very accurate and precise method for curving metal extrusions. The level of precision is so high that, in most cases, even intricate multi-components and snap-together curtainwall components can be formed without loss of section properties or original design function. Stretch forming capabilities include portions of circles including half-circles and eyebrows, ellipses and arched shapes. These shapes can be formed with straight leg sections at one or both ends of the curve. This method of curving eliminates several conventional fabrication and welding steps.

Stretch forming is a metal forming process in which the extrusion or part is kept under constant tension while stretched and bent simultaneously over a die in order to form contoured parts. The variety of shapes and cross sections that can be stretch formed is almost unlimited. Window systems, skylights, storefronts, signs, flashings, curtainwalls, walkway enclosures, and hand railings can be accurately and precisely formed to the desired shapes.

stretch1The basic machine design has two arms or carriage beams that hold multiple-positioning gripping jaws. The jaws are attached to hydraulic tension cylinders that provide the stretch of the extrusion. The arms swing by rotating on large machined pins with bearings, thus allowing the extrusion to wrap around and against the forming die. This produces perfectly contoured products, while limiting or even eliminating wrinkling inside the arc.

Close and consistent tolerances, no surface marring, no distortion or ripples, and no surface misalignment of complex profiles are important benefits inherent in stretch forming (given understandable tightness of radius limitations on some shapes). A smooth and even surface results from the stretch forming process.

Structural or Load-Bearing Application vs. Non-Structural Application

Aluminum has proven itself as a suitable material for load bearing structures for more than 100 years. However, the application of the parts being curved dictates how the curving process will need to be carried out.

After being pushed through an extrusion press, extrusions are generally cut and then placed into a tempering oven to harden and give them their structural integrity. When extrusions are fully tempered to a T5 of T6 temper they are difficult to curve. If a customer desires to curve parts that have been fully tempered the parts will need to be annealed prior to curving. When a part is annealed it is placed in a large oven and heated to a very high temperature for a specific period of time. Annealing makes the extrusion soft again, enabling it to be curved. Once an extrusion is annealed, it cannot cost-effectively be re-tempered. In applications where the parts are expected to carry a structural load, or are desired to have another structural application, annealing is generally not an acceptable practice.

For structural or load-bearing applications, best practice is to have extrusions tempered to a soft state T1, T4 or to a T52 state. Material tempered to a T1 or T4 temper can be bent without annealing, and can then be tempered (hardened) after the curving process to a T5 or T6 temper typical in structural applications. T52 is a very stable temper and can be curved without annealing, and it maintains its properties after curving without the need for tempering.

Stretch Formings’ Effect on Finishing

Crazing of the anodized surface

Crazing of the anodized surface

Similar to the curving process, the end application of the part will determine the best practice for how curved parts should be finished.

If an extrusion has been painted or anodized, and has been tempered to a T5 or T6 hardness, the parts will need to be annealed. Because of the high heat associated with the annealing process, paint finishes will likely burn and anodize finishes will likely discolor or craze (crack). For this reason, when parts require annealing it is best to finish after the curving process has been completed.

For extrusions that have been tempered to a T1, T4, or T52 hardness, parts can be finished prior to curving. However, customers should expect some marring or slight damage to the finished surface due to the parts being “stretched” across a hard die surface during the curving process. Again, depending on the tightness of the radius anodic coatings may also craze or discolor as a result of being curved.

If the T1 or T4 tempered extrusions require oven-aged tempering after curving, the high heat will likely damage the coating.

McDonalds interior dispay2 Jay&Kay mfgRegardless of the effect the curving process has on the finish, all manufacturer and applicator warranties are generally voided when extrusions or brake metal are finished prior to curving. To obtain the best finish quality and keep parts fully warranted, it is best to finish after curving regardless of the temper of the extrusion.

It should also be noted that on parts that require a poured thermal break, it is also best practice to have extrusions thermally broken after curving so there is no cracking of the thermal break, and the manufacturer’s warranties stay intact.

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Learn more about Linetec’s capabilities on our website or contact us at sales@linetec.com or 888-717-1472.

Linetec finished project wins MCA’s 2014 Chairman Awards

MCA’s 2014 Chairman Awards Institutional Award Winner:

Exploration Tower at Port Canaveral in Port Canaveral, Florida

PortCanaveral1 (1)With its shimmering, iridescent exterior, Exploration Tower at Port Canaveral beckons visitors with its unique appearance as its color changes in different light and at different angle. Opened in November 2013, the Port’s iconic welcome center showcases the first use of Valspar’s new Kameleon™ Color mica coating as spray-applied to Firestone Metal Products’ UNA-CLAD™ metal wall panels by Linetec, one the nation’s largest finishers of architectural aluminum.

An integral part of Florida’s Space Coast and Canaveral Cove’s revitalization, Exploration Tower is owned by Canaveral Port Authority. Its opening coincides with the Port’s 60th anniversary of its establishment and the 500th anniversary of Ponce de Leon’s landing on Florida’s east coast.

PortCanaveral2Taking its cues from the shapes and hues of the port, GWWO Inc./Architects designed the $23 million, seven-story, sail-shaped structure to express the common characteristics of “transience, function and imagery.” The building’s southern elevation soars from the water to the sky. It narrows in scale and reduces its exterior coverage until only the steel frame remains to outline the curvature and comes together at a peak 60-feet above the main roof level.

The building’s dynamic form and features – sun louvers, exposed structure and iridescent skin — contribute to a constant sense of movement as the sun plays across the structure, meet functional needs, and evoke imagery of the Port and [Brevard] County. A rocket ready to launch, a surfboard in the sand, a ship’s hull, a rocket contrail; all can be seen in the structure’s striking presence.

PortCanaveral3The MCA members involved with the project was Firestone Metal Products and Valspar and the project featured UNA-CLAD Aluminum flat MCM wall panels.  The architect was GWWO, Inc.  The contractor was Skanska USA and the metal installer was KENPAT USA, LLC.  Firestone Metal Products was the manufacturer, Linetec was the metal finisher using a Valspar coating.

More information on the MCA’s 2014 Chairman Awards

Linetec to expand with a third anodize line in Wisconsin adding jobs, capacity, capabilities; maintaining lead times

LinetecAnodize_web-300dpiLinetec, one of the largest architectural finishing companies in the U.S., is expanding its capacity and capabilities with a third anodize line. The 120,000-square-foot addition and associated improvements are estimated to cost $15.3 million and to bring nearly 100 jobs to the city of Wausau, Wisconsin. In January 2014, Linetec opened a 30,000-square-foot addition, with an additional 30% anodize capacity, to its existing anodize lines, which are operating at full capacity.

“We plan to have this additional line fully functional by Summer 2015 and are breaking ground immediately to get the site work completed prior to the cold, winter months. This will make us the only company in North America to have three architectural anodizing lines,” said Rick Marshall, Linetec’s president. “As the market continues to show strong recovery, our customers continue to experience tremendous growth and we are expanding to meet their needs.”

Linetec’s vice president of sales, Jon Close, added, “We are making this significant investment to stay ahead of demand. As our industry continues to recover and grow, we are seeing finishing lead times, particularly for anodize finishes, being pushed out to lengthier waits. This expansion will ensure ample capacity to give our customers the high-quality anodize finishes, consistent lead time and reliable service that they have come to expect from Linetec, as well as giving us the freedom to introduce new finishing capabilities.”

LinetecAnodize_web-300dpiLinetec’s anodize is specified on architectural aluminum products, such as window and door systems, storefront framing, sun shades, light shelves, canopies, column covers, panels and flat sheets. Unlike other finishes, anodizing highlights aluminum’s metallic appearance. Because it is an integral part of the substrate, the anodic coating results in a hard, durable substance providing excellent wear and abrasion resistance with minimal maintenance.

The new anodize line, like Linetec’s other anodize lines, are fully automated and use the most recent technology. Linetec also pioneered environmental innovations in anodize that resulted in its industry-leading, eco-friendly anodize process. Compared with traditional anodize, Linetec’s process reduces waste by as much as 90 percent, decreases energy use, creates recyclable byproducts and enhances the durability and lifecycle of the finished product.

Once the planned expansion is completed, Linetec’s Wausau campus will span 670,000 square feet and provide room to further enhance production flow throughout the facilities. Along with its anodize lines, this space houses a comprehensive breadth of finishing and related services including liquid paint and powder coat finishing, thermal improvement and stretch forming services, warehousing, packaging and distribution.

For more information about Linetec and our services, please call 888-717-1472, email sales@linetec.com or visit www.linetec.com.

 

Linetec’s 29th Annual Customer and Supplier Appreciation Golf Outing

Linetec Thanks You signFriday, August 8th, was a picture perfect day for our 29th annual customer and supplier appreciation golf outing. Thank you to all 126 people who participated in our open house, tours, golf, and random games throughout the course.

Congratulations to the winning team with a score of -9. First place, this year, went to Bruce Duehr from Anderson Window/E-Series Eagle (Iowa), Cody Moren and Mark Johnson from Tormax (Texas) and Andy Joswiak from Linetec.

1st-Place 2014

Cody Moren, Andy Joswiak, Mark Johnson, Bruce Duehr

Please enjoy the links below to a few photos from the days events

Handling the Curves                       Rapid Fire

Iron Board Man                               Hooked on Samples

Card Ninja

Supplier Thank you sign

A very special thank you to our generous suppliers for helping to make this great event possible.

I’m already looking forward to next year!

Skylight finished by Linetec crowns The Alfond Inn at Rollins, Florida

Alfond-Hotel-06-low-resThe domed skylight crowning The Alfond Inn’s large atrium quickly has become known as the hotel’s “jeweled center” and key identifying feature of Rollins College campus’ new landmark in Winter Park, Florida. Manufactured and installed by Super Sky Products Enterprises, LLC, this multi-slope, dome skylight with cupola and finial spans nearly 39 feet in diameter. This signature glass structure is framed in aluminum, finished by Linetec in Valspar’s durable Fluropon® Classic II bronze finish.

The Alfond Inn’s skylight-capped, 112-room destination opened August 2013 as the city’s newest hotel, and one of only three in the area. Located 30 minutes from Walt Disney World, the new, boutique hotel is owned by Rollins College, Florida’s oldest post-secondary institution. The 107,000-square-foot Alfond Inn is operated by The Olympia Companies.

Alfond-Hotel-01-low-resBaker Barrios Architects, Inc. was selected to manage the hotel’s planning, architecture, interior design and landscape architecture. The Alfond Inn embraces the surrounding campus’ Spanish- Mediterranean revival style: softly curved corners, sturdy columns, white stucco and cast stone walls, wrought iron accents, high ceilings and as much natural light as possible.

Other highlights and amenities include 10,000 square feet of meeting space, a central courtyard, dog-friendly atmosphere, a luxurious pool, Hamilton’s Kitchen restaurant with locally sourced ingredients and a contemporary fine art collection worthy of a docent-led tour. The interior décor blends classic and modern, combining plaster, tile and wood with glass and metal.

Durability, recycled and reusable materials, daylighting, energy efficiency and other environmental practices are all attributes currently being reviewed by the U.S. Green Building Council for Silver certification with LEED® Green Building Rating System. As an environmentally responsible finisher, Linetec safely captures and destroys the liquid paints’ volatile organic compounds (VOC) content before the finished material arrives at the job site.

“For projects seeking LEED certification and other green goals, choosing durable products with no-VOC finishes can be an important part of the selection and specification process,” explains Linetec’s senior marketing specialist, Tammy Schroeder, LEED Green Associate. “Like other 70% PVDF [polyvinylidene fluoride] resin-based finishes, Valspar’s Fluropon coatings are amongst the most weather-resistant of all finishes, meeting the most demanding, exterior, architectural specification AAMA 2605-11.”

This specification requires paint coatings to meet rigorous testing performance standards, including more than 2,000 hours of cyclic corrosion per ASTM G85 annex 5, and heat- and humidity-resistance. Per AAMA-2605, the coating also must maintain its film integrity, color retention, chalk resistance, gloss retention, and erosion resistance properties for a minimum of 10 years on the South Florida testing site. Helping manage the Florida sunshine’s solar heat gain, the skylight also incorporates Viracon’s high-performance, insulated laminated glazing units.

Alfond-Hotel-06-low-resThe Alfond Inn is open to all who visit the Florida campus and presents a lasting, positive impression on Rollins College’s prospective students and their families. “We wanted them to feel at home — not just the students but the parents,” commented Shannon Michael Larimer, Baker Barrios Architects’ vice president of marketing, as reported in the Orlando Sentinel.

The $30 million hotel was built, in part, with a $12.5 million grant from the Harold Alfond Foundation. As a condition of the gift, revenue from the hotel funds scholarships to Rollins College through the Alfond Scholars fund.

The Alfond Inn at Rollins; 300 E. New England Ave., Winter Park, Florida, 32789; http://www.thealfondinn.com

 

Linetec offers antimicrobial protection for architectural products

Linetec offers the use of antimicrobial protection for high-touch, architectural metal products’ exterior and interior surfaces, such as doors, windows, curtainwall, entrances, panels and column covers.

AssaAbloy-interior StJoseph Hospital Syracuse NY

St Joseph Hospital Syracuse, NY. Courtesy of Assa Abloy

Antimicrobial protection is infused into select polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) finishes to inhibit the growth of stain and odor causing bacteria on the coating of aluminum surfaces for health care facilities, educational campuses and other buildings. As a fluoropolymer finish containing a minimum of 70% PVDF resin, this three-coat system meets requirements of AAMA 2605, the most stringent specification for architectural coatings.

We are continually investing in industry-leading innovation, providing our customers’ products with protection that exceeds other conventional finishes. Anywhere the growth of stain and odor-causing bacteria is a concern, architectural aluminum manufacturers can benefit from this extra level of protection.

Providing further explanation, we have co-authored a White paper titled, “Antimicrobial Protection for Public Building Applications.” The paper describes the uses and advantages of antimicrobial coatings, as well as details the related technology, testing and specifications.

For more information, please contact Linetec at 888-717-1472, sales@linetec.com or www.linetec.com.