Architectural Paint Data Sheet

Process  .  Warranty  .  AAMA Specifications  .  Guide Spec

Architectural-Paint-Data-Sheet-1Download complete data sheet

High-performance fluoropolymer resin-based coatings may be defined as a thin layer of plastic film containing resin, binder and pigments that is applied to the surface of an object to provide protection and a decorative organic coating. The exact composition of a particular paint coating is often complex and proprietary.

Fluoropolymer resin-based coatings provide protection against… read more

High-Performance Architectural Paint Process

Paint systems are designed to be applied over clean metal that has been properly pretreated.

Without a proper pretreatment, delamination will likely happen within the first year of installation. To prevent, and warranty against, this type of failure a chrome-type pretreatment is recommended.    read more

ArchResourceImage-LinkedInStrengths of High-Performance Paint

  • Color Retention (UV resistance)
  • Salt-spray resistance
  • Vast array of color choices
  • Paint protects and maintains the structural integrity of the aluminum
  • Field touch-up / repainting capabilities
  • Small-batch and custom color capabilities – fast and cost effective

Paint Warranty

Projects painted by Linetec, utilizing liquid PVDF resin-based coatings, are warranted by the strength of both Linetec and the paint manufacturer. Linetec’s documented testing allows us to offer warranties of 10 years, on high-performance (AAMA 2605) coatings, with confidence that your product will perform as intended.

In some cases, with prior approval and a minimal up-charge, Linetec can offer an extended warranty up to 20 years on AAMA 2605 coatings. read more

AAMA Specifications

In order to ensure the paint performance expected for an architectural / commercial application, AAMA 2605 specification should be referenced along with the paint color.

Beyond the stringent standards and regulations, Linetec offers a downloadable guide spec with specifiable differences that contribute to a project’s long life, durability and sustainability.   read more

Damaged_Anodize-McDonalds door-brickwashCleaning and Maintaining your Aluminum Finish Guide

This paper discusses the recommended care of painted and anodized finishes on architectural metal and examines three levels of concern: care and cleaning, minor repairs, and more complex refinishing.             read more

Construction Specifier shares Linetec’s anodizing expertise

Flapper2-webThe April issue of Construction Specifier features “Five Factors for Variation in and Anodize Finish,” authored by Linetec’s Tammy Schroeder.

The six-page educational article describes the anodizing process and key considerations to minimize color variation. These essential factors include:

  • Aluminum alloys and their alloying elements
  • Mixing aluminum alloys means mixed results
  • Primary vs. secondary aluminum
  • Chemistry of the anodize process
  • Surface preparations

Construction Specifications Institute members received the printed magazine, and all can view the feature online, page 62.

After April, please visit https://www.constructionspecifier.com to create a free account and access the archived digital editions.

Follow the links to learn more about Linetec’s anodize process and how we ensure the most consistent color.

How long will my paint’s color last?

PRESTON-HYUNDAI-1---Preston-MD=webFrom the moment painted coating is applied to a surface, it begins to degrade from exposure to the elements. Over time, the difference between a coating’s original and current color becomes more pronounced. Selecting a coating designed for the environment where the painted aluminum product is installed, and taking steps to protect it, will help ensure color that lasts as long as possible.

When discussing how long a painted coating’s color will last, we usually refer to “fade.” Fading occurs from the oxidizing or leaching of pigment from the paint, causing its color to alter from its original application. Intense UV radiation (i.e. daylight) also causes fading. All paint color will fade eventually, but the degree of fade can be reduced with knowledgeable selection and basic maintenance.

Specifying for Fade Resistance

The American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s industry-leading performance standards – AAMA 2603, 2604 and 2605 – for architectural painted coatings specify color retention in terms of Delta-E (dE). A dE is a unit of measurement between two colors where 1.0 is the smallest difference a human eye can see. As time passes and a finish drifts from its original hue, its dE increases.

  • AAMA 2603 requires that a paint show only “slight” fade after one year. This pertains to baked enamel coatings typically used for interior application where color retention is not a large concern.
  • AAMA 2604 requires that a painted coating must not fade more than 5 dE over five years. This pertains to 50% PVDF resin-based coatings and typically is used for storefronts, doors or other high-traffic areas.
  • AAMA 2605 requires that a painted coating must not fade more than 5 dE over 10 years. This pertains to 70% PVDF resin-based coatings and typically is used for curtainwall and window wall on monumental architectural projects.

Formulating for Vibrant, Durability

The composition of a paint’s pigments will influence how quickly it fades. Inorganic pigments fade more slowly than organic pigments. Some brighter, more vibrant colors – such as bright red – traditionally use organic pigments to achieve their desired hue. The organic pigment’s greater susceptibility to fading can be combatted by applying a clear-coat over the topcoat of paint. This helps minimize UV exposure to the more vulnerable pigment.

WeatheringPanels

Image shows fade comparison of Kynar 500 (AAMA 2605) to Polyester (AAMA 2603)

Cleaning for Longevity

Once applied, even a durable finish will require occasional cleaning to slow its fading. Avoid cleaning a coated surface with strong acid or alkali cleaners. Instead selecting a mild soap solution for washing your finished surfaces.

Learn more about color retention and Linetec’s paint finishing services by clicking here . For personalized assistance in selecting the right coating for your aluminum building products, please contact Linetec’s regional sales managers , email sales@linetec.com or call 888-717-1472.

 

Designed for resiliency and acoustic performance, University of Iowa Voxman Music Building features Linetec’s anodize finishing and thermal improvement services

Voxman-Construction_UniversityOfIowa-webThe University of Iowa (UI) School of Music in Iowa City celebrated its 110th anniversary with a new home – Voxman Music Building. Designed for durability, sustainability and the highest acoustic performance, the 190,000-square-foot project features energy-efficient window and curtainwall systems, finished and thermally improved by Linetec.

The $152 million project is targeting LEED® for New Construction Gold certification. Wausau Window and Wall Systems worked closely with glazing contractor Architectural Wall Systems (AWS) to achieve the design intent set by LMN Architects and Neumann Monson Architects. Mortenson Construction served as the construction manager agent for UI.

“We conceived the project as a means of extending the public space inside the building, and we do that with glass,” says LMN partner and project designer, Stephen Van Dyck, AIA, LEED AP. “The window systems play a huge part in creating the visual transparency between the public and the performers, and the connection from within and without of this educational and cultural building.”

Linetec Products Support Project Sustainability Goals

Voxman_UniversityOfIowa3651Linetec’s thermal improvement services and anodize finishing are key contributors to the window systems’ energy-efficiency, visual appeal and durability. The anodizing process produces a uniform, hard and protective finish. Linetec’s anodize finishes meet the requirements of the American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s stringent Class I specification standard, AAMA 611-14. The anodized aluminum resists the ravages of time, temperature, corrosion, humidity and warping, for a long product life cycle. Anodized aluminum may be specified with recycled content and is 100 percent recyclable.

In addition to durable finishes and recyclable materials, Linetec helped support the project’s sustainable and LEED goals for thermal comfort and energy performance by providing thermal barriers for Wausau’s window and curtainwall systems. Both Linetec and Wausau also are considered local suppliers, as they are located within a 500-mile radius of the UI campus.

Unique Window Systems Supply Natural Light and Visual Appeal

Wausau’s systems also contribute to recognized benefits of daylight and views, and are a main visual feature of the building. The glass exterior begins beneath the concert hall, wraps around and up to the main entrance and continues over the recital hall, reaching heights of 50 feet.

One of the building’s most unique features is the shingled curtainwall – called the “warped wall” – overlaying the recital hall, in which construction of glass and metal units are layered to create an undulating slope that appears to gently pour from the building’s roof to its base. On the interior, a central atrium funnels natural light into the building.

Large-scale window systems are rare in musical spaces due to the acoustic challenges they can present. By choosing a low-iron glass with a low roller wave and horizontal orientation, acoustic and visual distortion was minimized. Large panes of glass diffuse sound at different rates on the shingled wall, and tall and narrow windows minimize vibration throughout.

Prioritizing Acoustic Isolation and Performance

“The acoustic requirements for this project are of utmost relevance,” emphasizes Chucho Loria, AIA, with Neumann Monson Architects. “Wausau’s team looked at the various conditions in the project. They developed details, during the shop drawing review process, to ensure that their system would meet the design intent of the project. It was apparent in those details that Wausau was taking efforts to make their system interact with the rest of the building.”

“We prefer an integrated, whole building approach – especially with complicated engineered projects,” says Doug Laffin, Wausau’s architectural sales representative serving Iowa. “Our systems may be just one part of that whole, but everything must work together to successfully deliver the architectural vision and critical functionality.”

“Almost all of the job was acoustically sensitive,” says Lee Ebel, AWS project manager. “Wausau produced and had tested units that verified the system would meet the necessary STC ratings at the corresponding frequency.”

Sound Transmission Class (STC) is a single-number rating system for acoustical performance, where a higher number indicates better performance. The Voxman Music Building’s design specified an STC 55, which is suitable for blocking loud noises including musical instruments.

“Almost every room is acoustically isolated,” explains Van Dyck. “This means that instead of the usual one wall, one floor between each room, there are two or three walls and two floors to separate most of the rooms and keep sound from transferring between them. We’re also trying to keep the sound from passing from the outside into the building’s interior. The windows are a big part of that equation.”

Adding glazing mass, increasing air space and improving damping by the addition of a laminated interlayer achieve improvement in acoustical performance. Of course, maintaining an airtight assembly to reduce “flanking” noise is critical, especially at high frequency. All three approaches were used to meet the acoustic requirements of the Voxman Music Building.

“The goal was to have virtually no outside noise in the recital hall,” says Randy Arneson, Wausau’s senior estimator on the project. “There’s 5-inch airspace between the inside and outside glass lites of our curtainwall to decrease sound transmittance. For the majority, we used Viracon’s 1-5/16-inch OptiWhite laminated, insulating, specialty glass.”

In the concert hall, the glass was glazed into the window system’s interior-facing plane with a 3-inch airspace. On the exterior-facing plane, electrochromic SageGlass was installed. Electrochromic (EC) glass darkens or clears when a low-voltage DC current is applied. Wausau incorporated the necessary wiring paths to connect the windows’ EC glass with a user-controlled switch. This enhanced functionality allows the faculty and students to reversibly control the sunlight entering their space and to maintain their outside view without shades or blinds.

“Wausau provided these elegant, tall, thin windows with EC glass. They’re really cool. When the windows are turned ‘on’ and tinted, they produce this really nice, diffused light,” says Van Dyck.

“They’re very narrow – some are only 1 foot wide, but 40 feet tall. The smaller span actually helps with the acoustics. The stiffer it is, the less it wants to vibrate.”

Ensuring Quality, Durability and Sustainability

Beyond acoustic performance, Ebel says, “The curtainwall system went through a rigorous performance mock-up test at a certified laboratory in Miami, Florida. The testing included air, water, dynamic, structural, seismic racking and thermal cycling.”

Ebel adds, “The typical LEED requirements applied to this project.” The window systems’ high performance features contribute to quiet, comfortable spaces that promote concentration and creativity, as well as a whole building approach to energy-efficiency, daylighting and outside views.

AWS installed Wausau’s SuperWall curtainwall, custom-engineered fixed and operable windows, and nearly 23,000 square feet of INvision 1050i-UW Series unitized curtainwall. Glazing and sealing in a factory-controlled environmental ensures that conditions are maintained to achieve the intended performance required for the project. Shipped one lite wide by one floor tall, the interlocking, pre-assembled units make the system easy to install on the job site. This saves labor, time and associated costs.

The curtainwall and window systems’ installation was finished on time and on budget. “It took a lot of coordination between all parties, and modeling of the curtainwall and structure to ensure that everything would fit correctly in the field once installation started,” Ebel says.

“Aesthetically, the project looks great,” concluded Van Dyck. “But, let’s face it, for this project, it wouldn’t matter how great it looks if doesn’t sound great, too. The window systems are a critical part of that success.”

Voxman exteriorsA Highly Anticipated New Home for the UI Music Department

UI’s new music facility replaces its former location, which was damaged by the 2008 flood. Programming and schematic design began in 2011. In 2014, the new building’s essential structure was completed and the building envelope could begin taking shape.

The Voxman Music Building was substantially completed in July 2016 and welcomed its 450 music students and 60 full-time faculty on Aug. 22, 2016. The grand opening and ribbon-cutting event was held on Oct. 21, 2016. The 324-room space includes classrooms, teaching studios, a library, offices, recital spaces, a rooftop terrace, a 700-seat concert hall and a 200-seat recital hall.

David Gier is the first to serve as the UI School of Music’s director in the Voxman Music Building. The facility’s name honors one of his predecessors, the late clarinetist Himie Voxman who served as the school’s director from 1954-1980. Gier and the School of Music have eagerly awaited their new home.

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University of Iowa, School of Music, Voxman Music Building, 96 E. Burlington St., Iowa City, Iowa 52240; https://music.uiowa.edu

Learn more about Linetec’s anodizing, finishing and thermal improvement services by clicking here. For personalized assistance in choosing an the right finish for your aluminum building products, please contact Linetec’s regional sales managers, email sales@linetec.com or call 888-717-1472.

Linetec honors Mark Hall for 50 years of service

50yr-sign3-webWausau, Wisconsin (May 2017) – In 1967, future president Ronald Reagan was inaugurated as governor of California, The Beatles released “Magical Mystery Tour” album and Mark Hall began his career with what would become Linetec. Reagan left the governor’s office in 1975 and The Beatles broke up in 1970, but Hall is still happily at work today.

“I was 19 years old and a year out of high school when I started at Wausau Metals (now known as Wausau Window and Wall Systems), making $1.75 an hour,” Hall says. “I was part-time at first and worked in shipping, crating windows and loading them onto the truck. For extra hours, I’d clean anodize tanks. In May 1970, we added color to the anodize tanks and I moved to third shift. I’ve been there ever since.”

Continuous Improvement

In 1968, Apogee Enterprises Inc. was formed as a holding company to oversee a growing number of profit centers including Wausau. In 1983, Apogee founded Linetec with a single paint line. When it added the anodizing line in 1986, Hall officially became a Linetec employee.

According to Rick Marshall, Linetec’s president, “Linetec is honored and thankful to have someone of Mark’s loyalty, commitment and expertise. He was the beginning and foundation of the anodizing business for Linetec.”

Hall has seen significant changes at Linetec throughout the half century. He continues to be amazed at the growth of the company and the pace of technology that has improved efficiency and quality. “I used to have four people working with me to manually move the anodize loads from tank to tank. We’d set timers for each tank load to move to the next tank. Buzzers were always going off. Now, it’s just me running the line and everything is automated. The loads are bigger, but they take less time.”

He continues, “Back then, normal rework was 30 to 50 percent. A day with just 25 percent rework was great. Today, our rework goal is less than one percent!”

Tankline2-webDependable Teamwork, Consistent Quality

One thing Hall says has not changed during 50 years is the quality of the people—something that, along with a reliable paycheck and good benefits, has kept him loyal and happy at Linetec for so long. “I’ve always worked with great people,” he emphasizes. “I appreciate our teamwork and have enjoyed training many of our current tank operators.”

“Mark has set the standard for not only tenure at Linetec, but also in quality and consistency of our color anodizing. He remains the most consistent quality anodize line operator Linetec has in its ranks,” praises Andy Joswiak, vice president of operations.

Tank-operator-web“During my 11 years as Mark’s supervisor, he has always been very professional and does his job very well,” reiterates Tim Lynn, “Drawing from his many years of knowledge and experience, he matches the customers’ requested color with one of the highest accuracy rates of all the tank operators throughout the anodize plant.”

Keep on Workin’

Outside of his work at Linetec, Lynn says many people in the Wausau area also know Hall as their former school bus driver. For 28 years, he drove for the Marathon School District as bus driver on the kindergarten route, after school routes and sometimes took teams to athletic events at night. It is highly possible that Hall transported multiple generations. In addition to driving the school bus, and never missing a single child on his route, Hall also drove an oil truck for several years.

Between his part-time driving jobs and his full-time position at Linetec, Hall has not found much time for hobbies or travel. Instead, he enjoys watching NASCAR and the Green Bay Packers, and focusing on his family.

“I have a lovely wife, two daughters and two sons. I worked so many hours my kids would want pizza for Thanksgiving so they could have an ‘everyday meal’ with their dad,” he says.

Hall has no plans to slow down or retire, but says, “If I ever retire, I’d probably help out at the Humane Society.”

Mark-Rick-TimLynn-webHall’s 50th anniversary celebration breakfast was held May 4. Jane Kessel, vice president of human resources, notes, “The 50 years of knowledge that Mark has helps us ensure our customers get the highest quality anodize finish. It’s also a tremendous asset to our newer team members—especially during the extraordinary growth the company is experiencing.”

 

Linetec People to Know – Ray Kroll

Ray---Half-Iron-7-17-16---2Q: Tell me about your job?

A: I am the Plant Manager of Linetec’s anodize facility. I am responsible for the day-to-day operations of the plant, as well as strategic planning. Based on sales forecasts – we determine staffing levels, shift structures, daily and weekly overtime, etc. I am also involved in Continuous Improvement activities such as 5S and Lean.

Q: What did you do prior to Linetec?

A: I have spent my entire career in manufacturing, in several industries – textiles, screen printing and metal finishing. I grew up in the Midwest, but moved to South Carolina after graduating college. I spent nine years there. After three kids, we decided it was time to move back to Wisconsin to be closer to family. I worked for about three years at a company in Janesville, and three years at another company in Ripon, before moving to the Wausau area. I now have been with Linetec for almost 12 years.

Q: What is your favorite part of your job?

A: The people and the culture. Even with the growth challenges during the past several years, our team members always have amazing, positive attitudes. The willingness of our team to work overtime and to help wherever they’re needed makes my job significantly easier. I recently gave a plant tour and one of the people said they were amazed at how everyone smiles and says, “hi.” I’m told that it’s just not like that in other places. And although we have lots to do and our jobs can be stressful, people still like to joke around and have fun. It’s a great place to work!

Q: What poses the biggest challenges for you?

A: Growth. Over the past four years, our growth has exceeded our capacity. However, we have responded to that with many expansions – adding a third anodize line, increasing Linetec Management Inventory (LMI), doubling our thermal capacity, offering a new shift structure, adding more packaging teams, etc. The past six months reminded me of how things were a few years ago – solid safety performance, good production performance, good OTC&C (on-time, correct and complete) performance, and strong financial performance. And I am convinced that this will be another exceptional year for our anodize team– with many much of the recognition we’ve frequently enjoyed in the past – VIP, meals celebrating our safety record and our OTC&C, and more!

Q: Are there any finishing type or color trends that you seeing more of lately?

A: We may only have a handful of colors available with anodize, but we are seeing more customer activity around our value-added services – such as bending, LMI, thermal improvement and special racking

Ray-web-golf-2011BeanBagGolf-(92)Q: What is something you are looking forward to?

A: Golf! Although I’m not a great golfer, I do enjoy getting out and playing during the summer months. I especially enjoy our Tuesday night league, which includes many current and past team members from Linetec and Wausau Window and Wall Systems.

Q: What is something people don’t know about you?

A: I have three grown daughters (two in college and one has graduated). With the additional free time on my hands, I have gotten into endurance racing – running and triathlons. I completed two marathons, and a half-iron distance triathlon last year. This year, I signed up for two more marathons, another half-iron, as well as the IRONMAN Wisconsin in September (2.4 mile swim, followed by a 112 mile bike and a 26.2 mile run)!

Ray-family - BB - UWEC at UWSP 1-6-16 - 8c - Copy           Ray - Half Iron 7-17-16 - 1 - Copy

Thanks AIA17 and hello, Wisconsin

Thank you to everyone who was able to join us as AIA Architecture Expo in Orlando. While we hope you took some time to enjoy the Florida sunshine, all of us at Linetec appreciate you for visiting us inside the convention center. It is always a pleasure to connect in person with current and prospective customers, service and supply partners, and colleagues across the industry.

IMG_0397-webWe particularly were proud to debut a proprietary Brushed Stainless color anodize finish. Helping enhance and protect architectural aluminum products, our new finish emulates the clean, bright surface that architects and specifiers find desirable in stainless steel. Brushed Stainless anodize creates a similar look on aluminum offering a more cost effective, lightweight option. You can anticipate more on this in the coming weeks.

“Anticipate” was the theme for 2017 AIA Conference on Architecture and the programming delivered on its promise to take a bold, fresh look at how the architecture profession is evolving. The AIA membership engaged in three days of discussion and education as to what it means to anticipate needs, challenges, and changes in our shared world.

Addressing these big questions as the keynote speaker, former First Lady Michelle Obama was eagerly anticipated by the opening day’s attendees. Echoing and expanding on her message, architect and 2016 Pritzker Prize winner Alejandro Aravena, architect Francis Kéré, and MASS Design Group co-founder and executive director Michael Murphy hosted short-form keynote sessions with a panel of renowned architects, engineers, creative thinkers and problem solvers on:

  • Anticipate Challenge: Design That Overcomes
  • Anticipate Need: Design That Cares
  • Anticipate Change: What’s Next in Architecture

Social psychologist and Harvard Business School professor Amy Cuddy provided the closing keynote on “Anticipate Change: Design That Evolves.”

Based in Wisconsin, we look forward to continue the thoughtful discussions from that national conference at our local AIA Wisconsin Convention & Building Products Expo. We’ll be at Monona Terrace in Madison on May 17-18, in booth #706, just across the aisle from our colleagues at Tubelite Inc. Expo hours are 3-7 p.m. on Wednesday and 11 a.m.-2 p.m. on Thursday.

Meeting face-to-face is ideal, but you also can reach us by phone at 888-717-1472 and email sales@linetec.com. We look forward to connecting again soon.