Feature article in Products Finishing helps in “Choosing the Right Finish”

IMG_0084-webProduct Finishing magazine’s December issue features an educational article on “Choosing the Right Finish for Coastal Projects” by Linetec’s Tammy Schroeder.

As the company’s senior marketing specialist and a LEED Green Associate, Schroeder has authored dozens of educational articles and presentations about painted, anodized and specialized finishes to meet the needs of many climates and geographies.

Click here to read this most recent article describing optimal, durable finishes for aluminum architectural products facing some of the most challenging conditions.

In addition to offering guidance on selecting high-performance finishes and avoiding corrosion, the informative piece also shares steps for proper maintenance to ensure an ideal appearance for years to come.

To learn more about how Linetec can support your next project and fine-tune finishes for its climate, please contact us for personalized service.

Protecting Aluminum Finish During Building Construction

RichmondCtyCourthouse-1In the November issue of Glass Magazine, Linetec’s Tammy Schroeder shares tips on “Protecting Aluminum Finish During Building Construction.”

High-performance paint and anodize finishes for aluminum add durability and color flexibility to meet architectural requirements. To ensure a resilient finish, the article offers 11 points to consider during storage and installation.

Click here to read the full story.

In addition to the 11 tips, Tammy reminds us to extra care to protect finished aluminum material after installation and prior to the building’s final acceptance as most damage to aluminum work will occur during this time.

Significantly reducing the opportunity for damage, Linetec partners with customers from the earliest stages of their projects through final completion. Please contact us for personalized service.

Is antimicrobial protection the right choice for my project?

microbes

Bacteria cells

When looking through the options available for architectural finishes, it sometimes can be difficult to know if certain choices are appropriate for your project. One such decision may be whether or not to include antimicrobial protection.

What threatens buildings on a microscopic level?

Microbes (or microorganisms) are living cells that are only visible once they have multiplied to the millions. Types of microorganisms include bacteria, algae, fungi and mold. Once microbes have multiplied to a large enough number on a surface, they may begin to cause stains, odors and even deterioration of the metal surface.

Unfortunately, by the time you can see an area of microbe build up, the damage is already underway, so prevention is the best form of protection.

germ-hand-webWhat areas are the most vulnerable?

 Microbes are prevalent in high-traffic areas. Anti-microbial protection may be a smart choice if your project is an office building, hotel, school, retail center, senior living facility, apartment, hospital or clinic.

Antimicrobial finishes can protect high-touch surfaces of metal products, such as doors, windows, curtainwalls, entrances, panels and column covers. The treated finish discourages microorganism build-up, while protecting the metal product beneath from damage and deterioration. This treatment is not meant to replace regular cleaning practices. When standard maintenance is combined with a resistant finish, microbe build-up and damage will be one less worry.

How can a finish stop microbes from causing odors, stains and even deterioration to metal?

Mitigating an invisible, destructive threat requires solutions on a chemical level. Antimicrobial protection begins with the composition of the finish itself. Starting with a 70% PVDF-resin based fluoropolymer coating, an ion exchange mechanism is infused into the coating’s chemistry. This small adjustment allows the finish to protect itself when the conditions are right for microbe build-up.

The most prevalent microbial threats to surfaces – bacteria and mold – need moisture to flourish. The ion exchange mechanism in the antimicrobial finish is activated by the presence of moisture, causing it to release silver cations. The silver disrupts microbes’ metabolism and reproduction. If a microorganism can no longer eat or reproduce, it cannot grow or damage the architectural metal products.

This protection can be added to PVDF-based finishes that meet AAMA 2605 requirements. The protection still allows you to select nearly any color option. Standard and custom colors, mica and metallic coatings are available with antimicrobial protection.

For personalized assistance in selecting and specifying the right coating for your aluminum building products, please contact Linetec’s regional sales managers , email sales@linetec.com or call 888-717-1472.

Whitepaper: Antimicrobial Protection for Public Building Applications

AAMA updates paint specifications to -17

AAMA-proud memberThe American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) regularly reviews and updates its specification documents, including for painted coatings. The association’s Aluminum Material Council’s Finishes Committee has adjusted AAMA 2603, 2604 and 2605. The most current versions are denoted as 2603-17A, 2604-17A and 2605-17A.

What’s changed?

In the updated AAMA specifications, the procedure rating the adhesion of coatings to different substrates (via tape test) has been removed. Those standards are still required to meet AAMA’s guidelines, but now Section 8.4 Peel Adhesion refers the reader to ASTM D3359 to find the details on tape testing. These AAMA specifications also reference ASTM D3359-17 for the new requirements for tapes used in adhesion testing.

Section 8.4.1 now clarifies that all tests shall be performed in the sequence they appear in the document. Connected to this, the order of testing has been changed in the specifications. References to subsections of 8.4 also have been updated in Section 5.5.

What’s remains the same?

As a member of AAMA, Linetec stays up to date on these stringent industry standards and documents. We are committed to ensuring our customers’ finishing specifications are met on every project.

For a quick refresher, here’s what to remember about AAMA 2603, 2604 and 2605:

AAMA 2603 – typical for interior specifications

Required to show only “slight” fade and chalking after one year, AAMA 2603 has no specifications for gloss retention and erosion resistance. Baked enamel (acrylic/polyester) paints should meet AAMA 2603. These painted finishes are less expensive than fluoropolymer resin-based coatings, but have poor resistance to color fading and chalking. Baked enamel coatings are harder than fluoropolymer and can be used for interior application where color retention is not required.

AAMA 2604 – an “intermediate” specification

AAMA 2604 specifications are more demanding. If a finish qualifies, then five years after its application the color must have faded no more than 5 Delta E, the chalking no greater than 8, the finish still retain 30% of its gloss and no more than 10% of it has eroded. This finish will provide good color and gloss retention. It also will provide good hardness and abrasion resistance. Painted finishes meeting this specification typically are a 50% fluoropolymer resin-based coatings and are commonly applied on aluminum storefront framing, entrances or other high-traffic areas.

AAMA 2605 – the specification for high-performance exteriors

Ten years after it has been applied, an AAMA 2605 paint will have faded no more than 5 Delta E, the chalking will be no higher than 8, 50% of its gloss will still be retained and only 10% of the film will have eroded. These finishes exhibit outstanding resistance to humidity, color change, chalk, gloss loss and chemicals. Painted finishes meeting this specification typically are a 70% fluoropolymer resin-based coatings and are commonly applied on aluminum framing and systems for monumental architectural projects.

For personalized assistance in selecting and specifying the right coating for your aluminum building products, please contact Linetec’s regional sales managers , email sales@linetec.com or call 888-717-1472.

To download the latest version of these, or any, AAMA documents, visit the AAMA Publication Store

What are common paint defects? How do you minimize them?

ILRegatta_MagellanSelecting the proper architectural paint for a project’s architectural aluminum products can ensure a visually pleasing result for years to come. Even when the correct painted coating is chosen, other factors can cause unforeseen defects to the aluminum product’s surface. Here are some common flaws that may occur, and how to correct or avoid them.

Pretreat the Metal, Dry Thoroughly

The condition of the surface to be coated plays a big role in the final product. The presence of oil, grease or other contaminants can cause adhesion failure in the paint. This could result in the topcoat peeling or flaking off. The rolling process of tubes and extrusions also can leave such a residue. For architectural finishes applied at a paint facility, baking of the paint after application is required, any reside not removed prior to painting, may run, or leach out, from beneath the coating, damaging both the paint and metal.

Your finishing applicator can avoid these flaws by pretreating the metal before paint ever touches it. Using a combination of high-power water rinses, high-temperature acid clean, etch and desmut and a chromium phosphate coating will remove most contaminants and increase the corrosion-resistance of the aluminum. A thorough drying process afterward will ensure that any remaining moisture is evaporated and that the finishers have an ideal surface on which to work.

Know Your Oil

Non-water soluble oils can lead to “fisheye” problems. Fisheye is a defect where circular depressions or “craters” appears in the finish. Most pretreatment systems are not equipped to remove these oils in advance, so if you suspect them to be present on your surface, be sure to discuss this with your finisher.

Watch for Corrosion

If the metal was stored outside before painting, it may suffer from corrosion in spots, which will stain in areas after being finished. Corrosion can be minimized or removed entirely by sanding the affected areas of the metal prior to finishing.

spray application4Apply with Care and Control

The process of paint application also can cause defects to appear later. Blisters or “pops” can appear beneath the surface of the finish after the curing process is complete, if there wasn’t enough flash off time before baking. Inconsistent coloring can occur in the paint if its application was inconsistent or the thickness of the finish varies across the surface. This will result in a coat that has color variation throughout, particularly if viewed from different angles.

These flaws can be avoided by quality-controlled, standard operating procedures for paint application on the part of the finishers. By applying the coating consistently throughout the process, the finishers can ensure less variation in the end product. A combination of automated spray equipment and painting specialists, helps to ensures an even, gradual coating application to prevent film build-up.

Send a Sample

If you are still concerned about the opportunity for defects in your architectural paint, consider sending a sample sheet of the metal that will be used to your finisher, as a mock-up, in advance. By applying the exact process that would be use for your actual project, any potential flaws can be identified and corrected in advance.

ArchResourceImage-arch resource center

Learn more about Linetec’s quality control and paint finishing services by clicking here . For personalized assistance in selecting the right coating for your aluminum building products, please contact Linetec’s regional sales managers , email sales@linetec.com or call  888-717-1472

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Building Enclosure features “Preventing coating failures”

Helping ensure the best finish for architectural aluminum products, Linetec’s Tammy Schroeder recently authored “Preventing coating failures.” Published in the July issue of Building Enclosure magazine, the article addresses the benefits and cautions of selecting paint and anodize finishes.

5-webWith proper consideration and application, finished architectural aluminum will retain its intended look and long life with minimal maintenance. A durable finish helps provide the desired performance in the harshest environments, including the highly corrosive seacoast. These qualities reduce the need to replace materials and components, conserve resources, optimize labor and save money.

Click here to read the online article.

Need help selecting the right coating for your project? Please contact us for personalized service.

5 Things to Know About On-Site Finishing Repair and Restoration

Regardless of its durability, no architectural finish is completely maintenance-free. Periodic cleaning is needed and, in such cases, on-site repair and restoration may be necessary. Here are five things to keep in mind when looking into on-site finishing services:

  1. Start at the source   Whether it is graffiti removal, premature paint chalking and fading, or an anodized surface needing to be refinished, begin by talking to the original finisher to see if they can correct the issue with their on-site team. If this isn’t a practical option or they don’t offer field repairs, please contact us to discuss a plan for restoring your finish to its intended appearance
  2. USCourthouse-RightNewlyPainted-webGo with the pros  For any large refinishing project, consult a professional service. On-site restoration and repair of sizeable architectural projects require specialized equipment and knowledgeable professionals. As projects like these typically are performed on occupied buildings, an experienced partner also can help minimize disruptions with appropriate scheduling and communication.
  3. MadisonCourthouse-fieldrepaint3-webPerformance counts  Ask if the coatings being applied during restoration and repair meet the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) specifications of the original finish application. One solution may be a PVDF resin-based air-dry coating that is field-applied by a qualified, professional finisher. Developed to meet green building criteria, these tough properties of these coatings resist marring and abrasion, and require little maintenance.
  4. Take care with touch-up  For minor scratches and blemishes, some applicators may supply a limited amount of touch-up paint. These are fairly easy to apply, but remember that they are only intended to cover a small area. It does not have the adhesion or durability of factory-applied coating, and will deteriorate at a faster rate. For best results, follow all instructions that come with touch-up paint and use it very sparingly. Also, when applying touch-up, use extreme caution as excessive use may void the original finisher’s warranty.
  5. Know your warranty  On-site project warranties vary greatly depending on the project and situation. If the issue being repaired is an applicator or manufacturer issue, the warranty most often will parallel the manufacturer’s factory warranty. For field repair and restoration work unrelated to a factory-applied issue, warranty options may be applicable depending on the base metal condition, base finish condition, site location or type of damage. Read carefully to understand the terms and timeline.

Learn more about Linetec’s on-site repair and restoration services by clicking here. For personalized assistance or to request a site visit, please contact Linetec’s field service manager, Dale Robinson, by emailing fieldservice@linetec.com or calling 888-717-1472.