Why does Linetec operate its own trucking service?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAWith condensed construction schedules and limited room at the job site, we understand how important it is for customers to have their finished material arrive as specified and on time.

To provide the greatest convenience and the best possible quality control, we operate our own fleet of trucks. As the nation’s largest independent architectural finisher and contract hauler, this allows us to provide you with cost-effective, reliable, damage-free shipments. Distribution points, and regular pick-up and delivery routes strategically covering much of the U.S., allow for frequent shipments from our home in Wisconsin to you.

Truck Types

Your finished products are transported safely and efficiently by one of our three truck types.

  • Local trucking – Linetec’s semi-trailers and straight trucks are used for deliveries within a 30-mile radius of Wausau, Wisconsin. Enclosed trailers can haul carted material, as well as crates and skids.
  • Open-top trailers – Linetec’s hard-side, open-top trailers have an open or tarped roof that is ideal for overhead crane loading and unloading. The hard sides eliminate the need to strap down the material, and airbags can be used to snug the material to the walls. Open-top trailers also can be loaded and unload from the tail end at dock height with forklifts and pallet jacks.
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    Accordian trailer

    Accordion trailers –Linetec’s accordion trailers are a flatbed trailer, but with a rolling attached tarping system. It allows the same above, side or end loading and unloading without the need for strapping down and packaging the material, although skids and crates must have closed tops. Our accordion trailers are ideal for lineal shapes, bundles, boxes and crated material.

Using experienced drivers we ensure your material is delivered damage-free. On Linetec dedicated trucking, your material is never offloaded until it reaches the delivery location. We also offer custom packaging solutions – from boxing and master bundling to individually packaging material into crates. Helping our regular customers to save on packaging costs, time and labor, Linetec also offers a cradle rental program for shipping of lineal extrusions.

Regular Routes and Other Options

Depending on the frequency and urgency of your deliveries, we can provide several options:

  • Linetec Managed Trucking, Regular Route – For our customers with weekly deliveries and pick-ups, we arrange for transportation via a Linetec truck or an outsourced carrier.
  • Linetec Managed Trucking, Dedicated Run – For customers that have truckload quantities of material moving either one, or both directions (inbound and outbound), Linetec arranges a dedicated truck.
  • Customer Managed Trucking – For customers that prefer to make their own arrangements with carrier of their choice, via common carrier (LTL) or exclusive carrier (truckload material).

With Linetec trucking, our customers no longer need to spend time finding and scheduling a contracted hauler to make the delivery. Freight costs are also more economical for partial loads when customers are effectively able to share a truck with other customers on the same route. Because we manage the truck and the schedule, we can better ensure that material will be picked up and delivered on time to your facility and ours.

We have over 45 weekly truck runs, on 12 different routes, throughout the U.S., currently cover most of the states east of the Rocky Mountains. Do not hesitate to contact us if your needs fall outside of this area, we will provide service or arrange for trucking whenever possible.

Please click the links for PDF downloads of our inbound and outbound trucking guidelines, and contact us if we can assist you with trucking and packaging options.

Linetec adds three associates to growing team – Brandon Slowiak as continuous improvement manager, Cody Horne as manufacturing engineer, Tad Klabacha as senior technical engineer

Wausau, Wisconsin (May 2018) – Three new associates have joined Linetec to support the company’s continued growth and its customers’ ongoing need for high-quality, high-performance, finished, architectural aluminum products. Brandon Slowiak started his role as a continuous improvement manager, Cody Horne as a manufacturing engineer and Tad Klabacha as a senior technical engineer.

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Brandon Slowiak

In his role as continuous improvement manager, Slowiak reports to Linetec’s vice president of operations Andy Joswiak. He is responsible for leading the company’s Lean initiatives and continuous improvement training and activities, inspiring a culture of continuous improvement, and driving results through ongoing process improvements.

Most recently, Slowiak worked as a value stream manager at Parker Hannifin Corporation, a global leader in motion and control technologies. Seven years ago, he began with the company as a process engineer and earned progressively more challenging roles while gaining experience in operations. Certified as a high performance team coach, he has led Lean manufacturing training programs. In addition to his knowledge of Lean, he has a bachelor’s degree in manufacturing engineering with a minor in business administration from the University of Wisconsin-Stout. He currently lives in Wausau.

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Cody Horne

Horne also is a University of Wisconsin graduate and lives in Wausau. He graduated from Marathon County with an associate’s degree and from Platteville with a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering. His professional engineering experience includes positions at Greenheck Fan Corporation, Neenah Paper, Hydratight and most recently, as a product engineer with custom hydraulic cylinder manufacturer JARP Industries, Inc. At Linetec, he will focus on continually and cost-effectively improving the manufacturing process. He reports to Bob Laduron, Linetec’s quality and process improvement manager.

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Tad Klabacha

Also reporting to Laduron, Klabacha also will recommend and implement continuous improvements through value-focused manufacturing processes. Drawing from more than a decade of experience in manufacturing, he previously worked at Vista Outdoor’s Federal Cartridge Company as a manufacturing engineering supervisor responsible for managing a 17-person team. He holds several technical certificates including as a Six Sigma Green Belt and for Lean manufacturing. He graduated from the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota with a bachelor’s in mechanical engineering. He relocated from the Twin Cities to the Wausau area.

Learn more about joining Linetec’s growing team of associates by visiting www.linetec.com and clicking “Employment.”

Located in Wisconsin, Linetec serves customers across the country, finishing such products as aluminum windows, wall systems, doors, hardware and other architectural metal components, as well as automotive, marine and manufactured consumer goods. The company is a subsidiary of Apogee Enterprises, Inc. (NASDAQ: APOG).

Linetec is a member of the Aluminum Anodizers Council (AAC), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Association of Licensed Architects (ALA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and the Window and Door Manufacturers Association (WDMA).

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Orlando International Airport’s South Intermodal Terminal Facility topped with Acurlite skylight, finished by Linetec

FL-OIA-ITFso_1788GOAAWausau, Wisconsin (May 2018) – Offering a seamless travel experience for the 44.3 million annual passengers of Orlando International Airport, the new Intermodal Terminal Facility (ITF) opened to Thanksgiving travellers in 2017. This completed the first phase of the South Airport Complex’s construction plan, which will continue through 2020. The ITF also is expected to be the first building on the Orlando International Airport campus to meet the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® v4 certification standards.

Featuring an 8,000-square-foot, heavy-duty commercial skylight, the ITF’s daylighting system helps connect those arriving and working within the space to the welcoming surroundings and Florida sunshine outside. Acurlite Structural Skylights, Inc. manufactured and installed the low-rise, segmented barrel vault skylight. Linetec provided stretch forming, thermal improvement and finishing of the skylight to meet the airport’s aesthetic, sustainability and high-performance requirements.

Performance-Driven Design

Orlando-_-ITF-web “Although the aesthetics are certainly important, the skylight specifications are more performance-driven than aesthetic,” acknowledges HKS, Inc.’s associate principal, project manager, David Thomas, AIA. “Firstly, we didn’t want it to leak and the skylight system needed to meet Florida product approval. The finish also needed to be able to withstand the harsh Florida climate and local airport conditions.”

The ITF’s skylight system exceeds industry standards for air, water and structural stability. Acurlite tested and fabricated the system with a 30-year life cycle theory for longevity of product and overall system performance.

Spanning 40.5 feet wide by 197.5 feet long, Acurlite’s skylight was fully shop-fabricated and shop-assembled for on-site unitization and installation on the ITF. Hundreds of aluminum-framed segments compose the total skylight system.

Linetec finished each aluminum framing member in a Bright Silver color using Valspar Fluropon Classic® II 70% PVDF architectural coating systems. Valspar’s two-coat, 70 percent PVDF resin-based finishes applied by Linetec meet or exceed the American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s high-performance exterior specification, AAMA 2605.

MCO picAmong the most weather-resistant of all finishes, paint coatings that meet AAMA 2605’s exterior, architectural specification comply with rigorous testing that involves withstanding more than 4,000 hours of salt spray and humidity. These coatings also must maintain film integrity, color retention, chalk resistance, gloss retention and erosion resistance properties for a minimum of 10 years on the South Florida testing site.

“The superior finish from Linetec allows Acurlite to provide an enhanced product to our customer that is aesthetically pleasing, but also can stand up to the harsh exterior environment, while providing a great warranty to the owner,” says, Matt Snyder, sales and operations manger at Acurlite.

Finished, Curved, Thermally Improved

As an environmentally responsible finisher, Linetec safely captures and destroys the liquid paints’ volatile organic compounds (VOC) content before the finished material arrives at the job site. For the Orlando International Airport’s ITF and other projects seeking LEED certification, choosing durable products with no-VOC finishes can be an important part of the selection and specification process. Painted aluminum extrusions also can be stripped, and re-used or recycled.

For the ITF project, Keymark Corporation supplied Acurlite with recycled aluminum extrusions. Prior to finishing, Linetec stretch-formed the extrusions to the barrel vault skylight’s required radius. Maintaining close and consistent tolerances, the stretch forming process yields a smooth and even curved surface.

To obtain the best finish quality and to keep parts fully warranted, it is best to thermally improve and finish the aluminum framing members after they have been stretch-formed. Installing the thermal barrier in the metal after it has been curved helps minimize stress on the thermal barrier and ensures performance as specified. Linetec is one of the only finish and service providers to offer thermal improvement services for curved and radius, finished aluminum extrusions backed with an industry-leading warranty.

Supporting Customers and Sustainability

“Linetec has been a great system partner to Acurlite and is our finisher of choice,” adds Snyder. “Between enhanced lead-times and customer service, Linetec has been a great supporter of Acurlite and our customers.”

Keeping travellers comfortable beneath the skylight and the outside Orlando sun, the skylight’s thermally improved aluminum framing complements the high-performance insulated glass unit (IGU). The IGU incorporates solar-control, low-e, laminated glazing, plus Viracon’s Viraspan Design silk screening, to achieve a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.24 and a U-factor of 0.45.

FL-OIA-ITFso_1797GOAAThe skylight’s thermal performance, recycled aluminum and durable finishes also support the Orlando International Airport’s Sustainability Management Plan, its LEED target and its goal to reduce energy use by 10 percent by 2018.

Along with the finished skylight meeting the airport’s sustainability goals and performance specifications, Thomas notes that it appeared to be a “quick and easy installation.” Acurlite installed the ITF’s skylight as scheduled by October 2017.

The overall, multi-phased timeline for the South Airport Complex began in early 2017 and is managed by Turner-Kiewit Joint Venture. Part of Greater Orlando Aviation Authority’s $3.1 billion Capital Improvement Program, the South Airport Complex ITF consists of approximately 2.7 million square feet of space accommodating four types of rail systems, an attached parking garage and an Automated People Mover system that links with the existing North Terminal Complex.

“Today’s travelers to Central Florida demand a higher level of service and efficient connections to other modes of transportation, so it is essential that we strive to stay at the forefront of innovation, customer care and improved connectivity,” says Greater Orlando Aviation Authority Executive Director Phil Brown.

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Orlando International Airport, South Intermodal Terminal Facility, 1 Jeff Fuqua Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32827

 

Located in Wisconsin, Linetec serves customers across the country, finishing such products as aluminum windows, wall systems, doors, hardware and other architectural metal components, as well as automotive, marine and manufactured consumer goods. The company is a subsidiary of Apogee Enterprises, Inc. (NASDAQ: APOG).

Linetec is a member of the Aluminum Anodizers Council (AAC), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Association of Licensed Architects (ALA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and the Window and Door Manufacturers Association (WDMA).

 

Curved, finished and complete – What you should know about architectural stretch forming

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Henry Ford Museum in Greenfield Village, Dearborn, Michigan, built in 1929, was renovated with large, arched top windows using stretch-formed, finished aluminum framing members 
Credit: Courtesy of Wausau Window and Wall Systems

Stretch forming was invented during the 1940s with the rise of the aerospace industry for the curving of aluminum aircraft parts to reduce weight, and thereby, fuel consumption. It expanded into car components and eventually, into the architectural industry. Architects and designers pursued new opportunities to create curved facades and building components.

The process of stretch forming is more of an art, than a science. It takes years of experience to become a skilled craftsperson that can stretch form consistent, successful, curved aluminum components for architectural projects.

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Stretch forming is a metal bending process in which a lineal shape, such as an aluminum extrusion, is stretched and bent simultaneously over a form, called a die.

Stretch forming is a metal bending process in which a lineal shape, such as an aluminum extrusion, is stretched and bent simultaneously over a form, called a die. Each form is built to the required radius. These forms may be customized for a special curvature and used only once, or re-used for more popular, repeating arcs.

Opportunities with stretch forming

Stretch forming capabilities typically include portions of circles, including half-circles and eyebrows, ellipses and arched shapes. These shapes can be formed with straight leg sections at one or both ends of the curve. This method of curving eliminates several conventional fabrication and welding steps.

The variety of shapes and cross-sections that can be stretch-formed is almost unlimited – from muntin bars and panning for windows, cladding and spirals for handrails, large mullions for building envelopes to serpentine shapes for canopies. Stretch forming allows architects, designers and builders to realize forms as graceful as they are sturdy and functional.

In most cases, the stretch-formed aluminum component’s curvature is so highly precise that even intricate multi-components and snap-together curtain wall components can be formed from metal without loss of section properties or original design function.

To achieve this level of precision, the basic stretch-forming machine has two arms or carriage beams that hold multiple-positioning gripping jaws. Both ends of the extrusion are inserted into the gripper jaws and stretched to their yield point. The jaws are attached to hydraulic tension cylinders that stretch the extrusion. The arms swing by rotating on large, machined pins with bearings that allow the extrusion to wrap around and against the form. This produces perfectly contoured products, while limiting or even eliminating wrinkling inside the arc. When the wrapping is completed, the stretch force is released and the gripper jaws are opened.

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It takes years of experience to become a skilled craftsperson that can stretch form consistent, successful, curved aluminum components for architectural projects.

Stretch forming maintains close and consistent tolerances with excellent repeatability, and alignments of complex profiles and compound curves. There should be no visible surface marring, distortion or ripples. These benefits inherent in the stretch forming process yield a smooth and even surface. Each component must meet the project’s specifications and warranty conditions.

Structural vs. non-structural application

Aluminum has proven to be a suitable, reliable material for load-bearing structures for more than 100 years. However, the application of the parts being curved dictates the process used.

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Vancouver’s PARQ Resort and Casino features a 23,000-square-foot façade with curved corners and curtainwall details made possible with stretch-formed aluminum framing members finished in clear anodize.
Credit: Courtesy of Gamma North Corporation

After being pushed through an extrusion press, extrusions are cut and placed into a tempering oven to harden and give them structural integrity. When they are fully hardened to a T5 or T6 temper, they are too hard to curve. If the parts to be curved have been fully tempered, they will need to be annealed before curving. To do this, the part is placed in a large oven and heated to a peak temperature range of 700 to 800 degrees Fahrenheit for two to three hours.

Annealing makes the extrusion soft again—enabling it to be curved. Metal that is annealed cannot be hardened again. Once it is softened, it will remain soft. In applications where the parts are expected to carry a structural load or have another structural application, annealing generally is not an acceptable practice.

PARQ-Vancouver-all-stretchforming-(8WEBFor structural or load-bearing applications, the best practice is to have extrusions tempered to a soft state of T1, T4 or to a T52 state. Material tempered to a T1 or T4 can be bent without annealing, and can be tempered after the curving process to a T5 or T6 that is typical in structural applications. T52 is a very stable temper and can be curved without annealing, and it maintains its properties after curving without the need for additional tempering.

Painted or anodized finishes

Similar to the curving process, the end-use application of the part will determine the best practice for how curved parts should be finished. If an extrusion has been painted or anodized, and has been tempered to a T5 or T6 hardness before being curved, the parts will need to be annealed. The high heat associated with the annealing process likely will cause painted finishes to burn and anodized finishes to discolor or craze. For this reason, when parts require annealing, it is best to finish them after the curving process has been completed.

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Orlando International Airport’s new South Intermodal Terminal Facility showcases a segmented barrel vault skylight featuring aluminum framing that has been stretch formed, thermally improved and finished in Bright Silver 70% PVDF architectural coatings.
Credit: Greater Orlando Aviation Authority

For extrusions tempered to a T1, T4 or T52 hardness, parts can be finished before curving. However, some marring or slight damage to the finished surface should be expected due to the parts being stretched across the form’s hard surface during the curving process. Depending on the tightness of the radius, anodic coatings also may craze or discolor as a result of being curved. If the T1 or T4 tempered extrusions require oven-aged tempering after curving, the high heat will likely damage the coating.

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The stretch forming process yields a smooth and even surface with each component meeting the project’s specifications and warranty conditions.

Regardless of the effect the curving process has on the finish, nearly all manufacturer and applicator warranties are voided when extrusions or brake metal are finished prior to curving. To obtain the best finish quality and to keep parts fully warranted, it is best to finish after curving—regardless of the temper of the extrusion. The American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA) publishes industry-accepted specification standards for anodize and paint finishing of architectural aluminum components.

Thermally improved curves

Rolled-TB-Extrusion-web136At least one U.S. finishing and service provider also offers thermal improvement services for curved and radius, finished aluminum extrusions backed with an industry-leading warranty. The thermal improvement processes may be specified as either a full pour-and-debridge of radius material, both structural and non-structural, or a fully crimped thermal strut system. The service provider places no restrictions to the degree of curvature, and finishes may be specified in liquid paint, powder coat or anodize.

Installing the thermal barrier in the metal after it has been curved helps minimize stress on the thermal barrier and ensures performance as specified. Choosing the thermal strut system provides the additional design flexibility of dual finishing, where the interior and exterior surfaces may be finished in different colors and formulations.

Ensure that aluminum products’ thermal improvement options strictly comply with its material suppliers’ standards and AAMA’s quality assurance processing guidelines. For optimal quality and convenience, some finishers provide a single-source solution where stretch forming, thermal improvement and finishing are synchronized and retain the full warranty. When available, utilizing the finisher’s trucks also can reduce material handling and packaging to minimize the opportunity for damage, while saving costs and time.

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The basic stretch-forming machine has two arms or carriage beams that hold multiple-positioning gripping jaws. Photos courtesy of Southern Stretch Forming

 

Linetec People to Know: Alex Jazdzewski

Alex-fam2Q:  Tell me about your job

A:  I’m the Senior Buyer for Linetec. I’m responsible for the daily procurement of the materials Linetec needs to do business – from both a tactical and strategic standpoint. I spend a good portion of my day in the tactical role, which include helping solve problems with the Linetec team, responding to internal purchase requisitions by our ERP system and by our associates to order materials, analyzing data on consumption of materials, and working with our vendors to ensure that purchase orders come in on time and complete to support our operations. The rest of my day, I’m in the strategic mode – working closely with the Linetec Sales and Operations team along with our vendors to strengthen our supply chains. Some of the strategic tasks that I work on include: negotiating purchase contracts, researching different avenues of supply, preparing RFQs and RFPs, and analyzing our supply chains to identify risks and mitigate them.

Q:  What did you do prior to Linetec?

A:  I worked for a local company in Central Wisconsin for almost 12 years that specialized in component building systems for residential housing. We could take almost any set of blueprints and design the floor, wall and roof system in components that were built in a factory and then assembled together on the jobsite. I held a number of positions with that company including drafter, structural technician, estimator, inside sales manager, production scheduling manager, field operations and logistics, and ultimately, procurement and supply chain management.

Q:  What is your favorite part of your job?

A:  The feeling of accomplishment when Purchasing assists the Linetec team in getting the job done. Working alongside such a great team of employees is very fulfilling and I’m proud to be able to support them in my role.

Q:  What poses the biggest challenges for you?

A:  The speed at which Linetec operates is second to none. As such, a major challenge for procurement is to make sure that we align with vendor partners who can provide us with high-quality products with short lead-times. We have a great group of vendors who have a deep understanding of Linetec’s operating environment – and we’ve developed very solid partner-based relationships with them. We can count on our vendors to get us what we need when we need it for our customers.

Q:  Is there anything new that purchasing has brought to Linetec lately?

A:  To speed up the service to our associates and our customers, Purchasing has pursued services that promote speed of transactions. In the past, the time between submitting a purchase requisition, placing a purchase order and delivery of that order could’ve taken 24-48 hours – or more. We now have a large number of vending machine on our shop floors that put tools, PPE and other production consumables at our associates’ fingertips – at the point of use. We also have increased the type and amount of vendor-managed inventory (VMI) and consignment inventory on our floors to ensure that our team has what they need whenever they need it. QR-coded supply bins and apps on mobile devices allow people to reorder supplies whenever they need them. We are even investigating RFID-controlled inventory lots to allow our vendors to quickly identify inventory on the floor and actively manage their production level to ensure Linetec’s supply.

alex-fam4.jpgQ:  What is something you are looking forward to?

A:  This summer! My wife Andrea and I just purchased property in the country on which we are planning to build a new home this year. I grew up on a family dairy farm in the country, but moved into the city when Andrea and I were married. We’ve lived in the city now for almost 14 years. We are excited to move back out into the country!

Q:  What is something people don’t know about you?

A:  I enjoy running and ran four half-marathons in three months last year. I’m planning another couple half marathons this year. I enjoy the challenge of pushing myself to do something that just seems almost impossible to do. My dad and I also dig the graves for our church.

Alex-famQ:  If Linetec gave you a surprise three day paid break to rest and recuperate, what would you do with those three days?

A:  My family and I enjoy camping and traveling immensely. We’d probably hook up the camper and take the time to go to Door County, WI. We would enjoy the area by hiking the great state parks there, some wine tasting and having some fun around the campfire.

Q:  What always cheers you up when you think about it?

A:  My kids! My son John is 9 years old, and my daughters Arianna and Ava are 7 and 5 respectively. They have great personalities and make me smile every time I think about them.

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Look for Linetec at AIA

Linetec will be exhibiting at three upcoming events hosted by the American Institute of Architects (AIA):

  • May 9-10, #B554 at AIA Wisconsin’s Conference & Expo in Madison
  • June 21-22, #361, Level 3, at the national AIA Conference on Architecture held in New York City
  • Oct. 11-13, #B19, at AIA Colorado’s Practice + Design Conference held in Keystone

AIA Wisconsin

WIAIA2018The annual AIA Wisconsin convention and exhibition returns to Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center. This year in the Expo Hall, not only will we be showcasing our latest products and services, we’ll also be participating in the in-booth AIA continuing education sessions.

National Accounts Manager Tony Pupp will be offering 15-minute presentations on “Architectural Coatings: Strengths and Performance.” Architects and others who complete this quick course will earn 0.25 Learning Units. This short session will be available throughout the exhibition hours: May 9, 1:30-4:40 p.m. and May 10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.

Click here to learn more and register for the AIA Wisconsin event.

AIA National in NYC

A18 logoFor the first time in 30 years, the national AIA conference returns to New York City. Called A’18 by those in the know, the Conference on Architecture will be held at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. The 2018 theme, “Blueprint for Better Cities,” focuses on creating inspiring, inclusive and resilient cities and communities that are better by design.

This theme continues through the A’18 Architecture Expo halls. The organizers anticipate 800 exhibitors spanning two floors and two days. The show floors will be open on June 21 and 22, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Conference activities extend into June 23.

Be our Guest! Click here for your complimentary admission to the A’18 Architecture Expo. Registration is required for additional events and educational sessions.

LinetecBrushedStainlessAnodize-web3See our Brushed Stainless. Our proprietary Brushed Stainless color anodize finish will be the highlight of our booth. Samples will be shown in full-size and available as pocket-size chips. Helping enhance and protect architectural aluminum products, our new finish emulates the clean, bright surface that architects find desirable in stainless steel. Now, a similar look on aluminum can be achieved in a more cost effective, lightweight option with the same industry-leading durability of our other anodize finishes.

window-corner-detail-190pxWatch for Wood Grain. Offering the beauty of wood without the maintenance, our Gold Series of 14 different Wood Grain Finishes for aluminum also will be on display. Unlike natural wood, the finished aluminum will not swell, rot, warp or attract insects. Architects also appreciate the opportunity to convey the softness and warmth of wood in environments where a hard, cleanable surface is still desired, such as in health care and education facilities, or other high-traffic areas.

Shine with Copper. Many have wished they could have the classic look of copper, without the eventual patina. Our Copper Anodize fulfills such designers’ dreams, offering the look of rich, real copper without such shortcomings as salt run-off stains, galvanic corrosion and patina.

Terra-Cotta-Color-Rings5Touch the Terra Cotta. It looks like terra cotta, it feels like terra cotta, but it’s actually aluminum finished in our textured Terra Cotta Painted Coatings. Made with reliable 70% PVDF resin-based coatings, the faux finish delivers exceptional levels of performance and sustainability in a choice of 17 terra cotta colors.

Combine Form and Function. Don’t pick between curves and thermal performance – choose both. We are one of the only finish and service providers to offer thermal improvement services for curved and radius, finished aluminum extrusions backed with an industry-leading warranty. We also can enhance the thermal performance of simple, straight and rectangular shapes, and help meet building team’s goals for energy efficiency.

Take a Sample. We know that color is critical to your project’s success. Whether matching a corporate identity, team uniform or custom palette, we can supply project-specific color chips for any Linetec-specified order or quote.

AIA Colorado

Watch for more details on the AIA Colorado 2018 Practice + Design Conference. Registration opens soon, and our Linetec representatives already are booked to exhibit on Oct. 11-13 at the Keystone Conference Center.

Meeting face-to-face is ideal, but you also can reach us by phone at 888-717-1472 and email sales@linetec.com. Please contact us whenever we can provide personalized assistance in selecting the finish for your next project.

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Linetec wins Wisconsin Corporate Safety Award

Wisconsin Safety Council 2018

From left to right: Colleen Hruska, R. N., Linetec Occupational Health Coordinator, MacKenzie Lambert, Linetec Safety Coordinator, Brian Stratton, Linetec Safety Manager, and Janet Metzger, WSC’s executive director

Wausau, Wisconsin (April 19, 2018) – Wisconsin Safety Council (WSC) honored Linetec, one of the largest finishing companies of architectural aluminum products in the U.S., with a 2017 Wisconsin Corporate Safety Award. WSC says this award recognizes companies that “value their employees and take pride in ensuring their safety.”

Rick Marshall, Linetec’s president, shared the achievement and his appreciation with the entire company. He says, “We would like to thank each of our employees for earning this honor. We are fortunate to have developed a very safety-focused culture at Linetec, where our employees suggest and implement safety improvements on a daily basis, and even coach and recognize their peers on their safety behaviors.”

Mike Schauls, vice president of operations, adds, “The #1 core value at Linetec is safety. Each and every meeting throughout the hierarchy of our business begins with safety.”

Linetec’s safety manager Brian Stratton, safety coordinator MacKenzie Lambert and occupational health coordinator Colleen Hruska, R.N., accepted the award on April 18 during the 76th Annual Wisconsin Safety & Health Conference.

Stratton elaborates, “Striving for excellence, Linetec is continuously improving our already solid safety program. Our efforts and the commitment of our associates not only allows our company to maintain better than industry average safety performance, but also to achieve a world-class safety level by manufacturing industry standards.”

For metal finishing and coating businesses, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration reports a three-year industry average injury incident rate of 5.0. Linetec reported an incident rate below 1.0 for the 2017 calendar year.

“The single most important factor to our success is our associates,” says Lambert. “They do an exemplary job of reporting injuries, working with the nurse, and following safety policies and procedures.”

Linetec was one of 12 winners selected by an independent panel of 30 judges including safety, insurance and human resource professionals. Each nomination was evaluated for organizational safety and health leadership, training and implementation programs, employee participation, as well as safety accomplishments and goals.

“This year’s winners embody the success stories that make Wisconsin one of the safest states to work,” said Janet Metzger, WSC’s executive director. “We would like to congratulate the winning companies along with all the finalists as they are true models to businesses across the state of what it means to make the safety of their employees a priority each and every day.”

About Wisconsin Safety Council

WSC_logo_2cWisconsin Safety Council (WSC) is the state’s leading provider of safety training and products, serving members of all sizes and every sector of the economy. WSC provides scheduled training programs across Wisconsin, in addition to private, customized training for your individual company. It is also the number one resource for safety products ranging from first aid training materials to emergency defibrillators. WSC is the official state chapter of the National Safety Council and is a proud program of WMC Foundation.

About Linetec

Located in Wisconsin, Linetec serves customers across the country, finishing such products as aluminum windows, wall systems, doors, hardware and other architectural metal components, as well as automotive, marine and manufactured consumer goods. The company is a subsidiary of Apogee Enterprises, Inc. (NASDAQ: APOG).

Linetec is a member of the Aluminum Anodizers Council (AAC), the American Architectural Manufacturers Association (AAMA), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Association of Licensed Architects (ALA), the Glass Association of North America (GANA), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and the Window and Door Manufacturers Association (WDMA).

Wisconsin Safety Council 2018